Editorial Reviews
Amazon.com
The reissue combines two live albums, 1967's Forest Flower: Charles Lloyd at Monterey and 1969's Soundtrack on one CD. The earlier release was one of the few jazz albums to sell a million copies, and it owed its popularity not only to its suggestions of bohemian romanticism but also to the strength of Lloyd's writing and to the empathic interplay between the leader and his then-unknown bandmates, pianist Keith Jarrett and drummer Jack DeJohnette. The three recorded the very similar Soundtrack two years later. --Geoffrey Himes

Source: http://www.amazon.com/Forest-Flower-Soundtrack-Charles-Lloyd/dp/B0000033CC
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Charles Lloyd - Forest Flower/Soundtrack

Artist		Charles Lloyd
Album			Forest Flower/Soundtrack
Rating		star_rating(9) 5 Stars [AMG Pick]
Release Date	1968
Label			Rhino
Type			Live
Genre			* Jazz
Style
    * Crossover Jazz
    * Hard Bop
    * Post-Bop
    * Avant-Garde Jazz
    * Jazz Instrument
    * Saxophone Jazz

Review

by Bruce Eder

This Rhino two-on-one compilation CD puts together two extraordinary incarnations of the Charles Lloyd Quartet from different end of their history -- with Lloyd (tenor sax, flute), Keith Jarrett (piano), Jack DeJohnette (drums), and Cecil McBee (bass) at Monterey in September of 1966, and with McBee's successor, Ron McClure, in the lineup for a renowned Town Hall performance from November of 1968. At Monterey in 1966, they were new and breaking ground with practically every note they played -- the latter was no less true two years later in New York, but at that point the group was near its end, with Jarrett about to go off and join Miles Davis. Most fans will probably have this music in some form or other, but one advantage to this CD is the opportunity one has to hear "Forest Flower" in its first and last live incarnations -- and in a broader context, this disc makes a perfect set of concert "bookends" to the Lloyd quartet's history. There are no bonus tracks and the only notes are by George Avakian from the original Monterey album, but with music like this and beautiful sound, embellishment is hardly necessary.

Tracks
 	Title 				Composer 		Time
01 - 	Forest Flower: Sunrise 		(Charles Lloyd) 	07:17
02 - 	Forest Flower: Sunset 		(Charles Lloyd)	10:19
03 - 	Sorcery 				(Keith Jarrett) 	05:11
04 - 	Song of Her 			(Cecil McBee) 	05:16
05 - 	East of the Sun 			(Brooks Bowman) 	10:20
06 - 	Sombrero Sam 			(Charles Lloyd)	10:26
07 - 	Voice in the Night 		(Charles Lloyd)	08:47
08 - 	Pre-Dawn 				(Charles Lloyd)	02:34
09 - 	Forest Flower '69 		(Charles Lloyd)	16:51

Releases
Year 	Type 	label 	Catalog #
1994 	CD 	Rhino 	71746

Source: http://www.allmusic.com/album/forest-flower-soundtrack-r1553022
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5.0 out of 5 stars Late 60's jazz classic, September 4, 2003

By 	Edward M. Green "skin flautist" (Ann Arbor, MI) -    

This review is from: Forest Flower & Soundtrack (Audio CD)
There is a reason for only 5 star reviews for this cd. It is one of the most accessible jazz cd's for those starting an interest in jazz. The music is like a more mellow, bluesy interpretation of Coltrane and modal jazz styles of the 60's. This is one of those cds that resulted in a crossover hippie and college-aged audience, and as a result, this album and the charles lloyd quartet was the most successful jazz group at that time. The opening title tracks are the most interesting and accessible, and don't sound that far off from the psychedelic rock that was merging with jazz at that time. In fact, Miles was inspired enough by this group to borrow some of the personnel for his electronic explorations. The rhythm section is one of the better ones still around with Jack Dejohnette, Gary Peacock, and Keith Jarrett. Charles Lloyd might not be as famous now, but his more laidback, breathy interpretation of Coltrane, and his less derivative flute playing fit in perfectly with the Jarrett and Dejohnette. This is one of those cds that non-jazz fans ask me to copy for them when they first hear it. It opens non-jazz fans to new styles...like Coltrane, and 60's jazz and soul jazz. 

Source: http://www.amazon.com/Forest-Flower-Charles-Lloyd-Monterey/dp/B00124JDW4
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Charles Lloyd - Forest Flower: Charles Lloyd at Monterey

Artist		Charles Lloyd
Album			Forest Flower: Charles Lloyd at Monterey
Rating		star_rating(9)	(5 Stars) [AMG Pick]
Release Date	1968
Recording Date	Sep 8, 1966 - Nov 15, 1968
Label			WEA
Type			Live
Time			77:01
Genre			* Jazz
Style
    * Crossover Jazz
    * Hard Bop
    * Post-Bop
    * Avant-Garde Jazz
    * Jazz Instrument
    * Saxophone Jazz

Review

by Thom Jurek

Review

by Thom Jurek

When Charles Lloyd brought his new band to Monterey in 1966, a band that included Keith Jarrett on piano, Jack DeJohnette on drums, and the inimitable -- though young -- Cecil McBee on bass, no one knew what to expect. But they all left floored and this LP is the document of that set. It is difficult to believe that, with players so young (and having been together under a year), Lloyd was able to muster a progressive jazz that was so far-reaching and so undeniably sophisticated, yet so rich and accessible. For starters, the opening two title tracks, which form a kind of suite (one is "Forest Flower-Sunrise," the other "Sunset"), showcased the already fully developed imagination of Jarrett as a pianist. His interplay with DeJohnette -- which has continued into the 21st century in a trio with Gary Peacock -- is remarkable: whispering arpeggios surrounded by large chords that plank up the drumming as DeJohnette crosses hands and cuts the time in order to fluctuate the time. Lloyd's own solos are demonstrative of his massive melodic gift: his improvisation skirted the edges of what was happening with Coltrane (as everyone's did), but his own sense of the deep wellspring of song and the cross-pollination of various world musics that were happening at the time kept him busy and lyrical. Elsewhere, on Jarrett's own "Sorcery," his linking front-line harmonics with Lloyd is stellar -- this isn't communication, it's telepathy! Jarrett's angular solo is buoyed up by Lloyd's gorgeous ostinato phrasing. By the time the band reaches its final number, a sky-scorching version of Brooks Bowman's "East of the Sun," they have touched upon virtually the entire history of jazz and still pushed it forward with seamless aplomb. Forest Flower is a great live record.

Tracks
 	Title 			Composer 	Time
01 -	Forest Flower: Sunrise 	Lloyd 	07:17
02 -	Forest Flower: Sunset 	Lloyd 	10:19
03 -	Sorcery 			Jarrett 	05:11
04 -	Song of Her 		McBee 	05:16
05 -	East of the Sun 		Bowman 	10:20

Releases
Year 	Type 	label 	Catalog #
	CD 	WEA 	25015
2006 	CD 	WEA/Warner 	25117

Source: http://www.allmusic.com/album/forest-flower-charles-lloyd-at-monterey-r142875/review
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Charles Lloyd -
Forest Flower/Soundtrack

Posted: October 4th, 2008

Author: John Ballon

Date: September, 1966
Release: RHINO R2 71746
Cover Art: view / download
Buy the Album

Recorded live at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1966, Forest Flower was the jazz soundtrack of the Flower Power movement. Always accessible and majestic, the Charles Lloyd Quartet was recorded here at the peak of its powers. The title track, ôForest Flower,ö actually is split into two parts, ôSunriseö and ôSunset,ö which merge together seamlessly to form a single piece of astonishing unity, with Charles Lloyd, Keith Jarrett, Cecil McBee, and Jack DeJonette playing beyond the point of empathy. There is such sheer beauty and lyricism in the music that 30 years later it still gives goose bumps. It is almost impossible to be unmoved by ôForest FlowerûSunset,ö particularly when Keith Jarrett reaches inside the piano to pound out extraordinary sounds.

The music, like the band itself, is so fresh and innovative that it caused a mighty stir, eventually reaching Miles Davis himself. Miles picked up on LloydÆs sound and energy, ultimately recruiting DeJohnette and Jarrett, and moving forward to launch the musical revolution known as Bitches Brew. But before all of these radical changes, there was Lloyd, who deserves credit for dramatically expanding the audience for ôjazzö to include the hordes of acid-dropping, long-haired children of the 60s. Lloyd built up a new market for jazz artists, inadvertently paving the way for the commercial success of fusion. There are unmistakable elements of rock in the rhythms of DeJohnette and Jarrett, particularly on ôSombrero Sam,ö but this is not fusion. Lloyd plays the tenor with a heavy dose of Trane, but never in a way that sounds derivative. Still, it is in his flute playing, as evidenced on ôSombrero Sam,ö where Lloyd really shines in his individual brilliance. This album captures the spirit of the 60s without sounding the least bit dated. Check it out!

Source: http://www.musthear.com/music/reviews/charles-lloyd/forest-flowersoundtrack/
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In 1966, The Charles Lloyd Quartet was probably the hottest jazz group on the planet.
This recording is the one that launched them. Featuring Keith Jarrett on piano it still sounds good forty years later.

Charles Lloyd - Forest Flower: Charles Lloyd At Monterey  
 
01 - Forest Flower: Sunrise
02 - Forest Flower: Sunset
03 - Sorcery
04 - Song Of Her
05 - East Of The Sun

Charles Lloyd - tenor sax, flute
Keith Jarrett - piano
Cecil McBee - bass
Jack DeJohnette - Drums

Recorded: tracks 3 & 4 - September 8, 1966	New York City
	  tracks 1,2 & 5 - September 18, 1966	Live at The Monterey Jazz Festival

Taken from the CD: Rhino 8122-71746-2